Guanajuato to Puebla

Sorry for the long absence.  We’ve been winding our way from waterfall to waterfall through the Sierra Madre Orientals for the past week and haven’t had any internet access.  Right now we’re stationed at an RV Park in a little town outside of Puebla called Cholula. We’ve heard rumors about a huge pyramid  but aren’t here for that. In order to keep our posts in chronological order I’ll rewind a bit back to Guanajuato.

Adios Guanajato

Adios Guanajato

We left GTO about a week ago after spending two weeks in the labyrinth of a city. As much as we enjoyed our time there we were getting antsy for some fresh air and water.  Our time spent in GTO solidified the fact that we love being in wide-open spaces and could never live in a city. The hustle and bustle of city life just isn’t for us.

We left the city life with dreams of these wide-open spaces and headed for the hills. Next stop, San Luis Potosi and the Sierra Madre Oriental Mountains.

Fog over valley

Fog over valley

Our first stop was a lake that I had read about and put on our itinerary a year before we left.  La Laguna Media Luna is a lake that is filled via multiple man made water ways.  The lake is a prime location for scuba divers and I though it looked like a great spot to stop for the night. I figured we could take our paddleboards out for the first time in weeks and that Reina would thoroughly enjoy the fresh water.

After a couple of wrong turns and backtracking we made our way along a bumpy road towards the lake. Our first signs of trouble were literally signs.  Signs that we first noticed said (much to our dismay) “No Moscotas”, meaning, no dogs.  The second sign we noticed, really hit home, “No alcohol”, no translation needed there.  What kind of campground was this? No pets and no booze? We decided to continue forward in hopes that we could sneak both Reina and our recently acquired Bohemia beers into said campground.

When we got to the campground our hopes were smashed not only could we not sneak them in we would have to park the car in a parking lot and lug all of our stuff into the campground.

At this point we decided we had two options:

1)   We could sleep in the parking lot, get up early and head to a different spot.

2)   We could keep moving.  There was another camp ground was only a couple hrs drive according to our GPS.

After much deliberation we decided to keep moving. We didn’t know much about the next campground but we thought it couldn’t get much worse after the let down that was Laguna Media Luna.

Our two hour drive to the next campground took us up into the beautiful Sierra Madre Oriental Mountains.  The drive itself was worth leaving Media Luna behind. We had heard that San Luis Potosi was beautiful but we had no idea. There are mountains as far as the eyes can see without another soul in site.

The beautiful Sierra Madre Oriental Mountains

The beautiful Sierra Madre Oriental Mountains

The region we were heading into was called La Huasteca.  This whole area is known for rivers that hold some amazing rapids for whitewater rafting and kayaking.  It’s also home to some fabulous waterfalls.

We finally made it to our next stop (after a few more wrong turns) and couldn’t believe our eyes.  We really hit the jackpot on this one and were so happy that we decided to keep moving.

Cascadas de Tamasopo are three huge waterfalls and multiple smaller cascadas that weave their way along the edge of the cliff that shadowed our campground.

Two of the waterfalls with Reina thoroughly enjoying herself.

Two of the waterfalls with Reina thoroughly enjoying herself.

We were all in heaven. The first night we were the only people camping so we had all the waterfalls and swimming holes to ourselves. It was magical.  The water is a fabulous blue and so clear that it took your breath away jumping in because you couldn’t believe that you didn’t touch the bottom.

We spent two amazing days jumping off rocks, playing on the rope swing and exploring the ruins.  You could also hike up to the top of the waterfalls to enjoy more pools and cascadas.

We had these falls all to ourselves

We had these falls all to ourselves

The pools at the top of one of the falls

The pools at the top of one of the falls

Ruins at Tomasopo

Ruins at Tamasopo

Reina chickening out on the diving board

Reina chickening out on the diving board

After two relaxing days we set off in search of yet more waterfalls.  We found Las Cascadas de Micos easily but the campground was nothing like the Tamasopo. Needless to say we were a little jaded.  Instead of camping right at the cascadas we decided to camp at Aldea de Huasteca.  Aldea de Huasteca is located right on the rio with beautiful grounds and even a couple pet deer. Reina loved the deer. There were bungalows and a nice lawn for tent camping. We stayed one night at Aldea then moved south in search of Las Pozas in Xilitla.

Pretty grounds at Aldea Huasteca

Pretty grounds at Aldea Huasteca

Jamie relaxing by the rio with a cold Modelo

Jamie relaxing by the rio with a cold Modelo

Reina had her own personal cabin

Reina had her own personal cabin

The drive to Xilitla was nothing short of spectacular. The Huasteca region is truly awe-inspiring.  We passed numerous waterfalls and crossed multiple bridges with vibrant blue waters running underneath.   The road is lined with big green trees and miles of sugarcane.

The town of Xilitla itself is pretty cool.  It is perched on a ridge high up in the mountains. The centro is located at the highest point with very steep roads running down the sides.  We stopped in town to walk around and use the internet after a few days offline then went in search of a camping spot.

Xilitla is home to Sir Edward James’ famous labyrinth, Las Pozas (The Pools). Edward James was best known for his support and passion for the surrealist movement.  In 1941 he was encouraged by his cousin to travel to Mexico in search of a place to express himself and in 1945, with the help of a hired guide, Plutarco Gastelum, he found Xilita.  Between 1949 and 1984 James and Gastelum built tons of concrete structures connected by trails, stairs and suspended concrete bridges. Today many of the structures are crumbling and much of the stone walkways are more like trails but the fantastical feeling still remains.

When you come to the entrance of Las Pozas you can go right into the labyrinth or left to take a dip in the pools. We chose the former and spent most of our time exploring the maze of sculptures and concrete structures. Throughout our day at Las Pozas Jamie and I kept making comments like “This is amazing” and “I feel like I’m at Disneyland”.

On our way to Las Pozas

On our way to Las Pozas

Entrance to the labyrinth

Entrance to the labyrinth

Stairway to Heaven

Stairway to Heaven

Waterfall at Las Pozas

Waterfall at Las Pozas

We camped just up the street from Las Pozas.  A family has a big grassy yard that they charge $35 pesos per person to camp on.  We chose to camp under the big palapa and were the only people there once again.

The drive from Xilitla to Puebla was intense to say the least.  We read that it was going to take us 8 hrs and we had come to terms with that. We left bright and early Thursday morning with hopes of reaching Puebla by 1 or 2 at the latest.  We didn’t end up getting to the campground until 5:30. There were so many topes through every mountain town and we got stuck behind numerous semis.  It was a very long drive that took us up and over the mountains onto the high plains and down into the valleys.  It was beautiful but extremely tiring.

Ridin the Ridge

Ridin the Ridge

Infinity Runway

Infinity Runway

We are spending another night here in Cholula, just outside of Puebla and then plan on heading to Oaxaca.  Hopefully we’ll be in Puerto Escondido for Jamie’s birthday on the 13th! J

Cheers

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